VoIP Dynamic's Patent

VoIP Dynamics LLC owns a three-patent portfolio.

  • U.S. Patent No. 6,226,303, “DTMF Tone Detection and Suppression with Application to Computer Telephony over Packet Switched Networks,” claims A method of facilitating telephony communications over a packet-switched network includes detecting signaling tones in an audio stream and blocking them from the stream in response to the detecting. After the blocking, the audio stream is sent over an undependable channel in the packet-switched network. The detected signaling tones can be sent over a dependable channel instead of the undependable audio channel. This patent was filed on March 9, 1998 and issued May 1, 2001. For a .pdf of this patent, click here.
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,396,851, also titled “DTMF Tone Detection and Suppression with Application to Computer Telephony over Packet Switched Networks” is directed to a method of facilitating telephony communications over a packet-switched network includes detecting signaling tones in an audio stream and blocking them from the stream in response to the detecting. After the blocking, the audio stream is sent over an undependable channel in the packet-switched network. The detected signaling tones can be sent over a dependable channel instead of the undependable audio channel. This is a continuation of the ‘303 patent and was issued May 28, 2002. For a .pdf of this patent, click here.
  • U.S. Patent No. 6,920,143, “Computer Telephony System Using Multiple Hardware Platforms to Provide Telephony Services,” covers a computer telephony system includes a multi-platform architecture that provides a layer of abstraction between application software and hardware associated with a platform. According to this architecture, service modules residing on different platforms access computer telephony resources to facilitate performance of a variety of computer telephony services. Although local access to such resources is governed by diverse, platform-dependent protocols, the service modules communicate with one another according to a common, platform-independent protocol. In this manner, cross-platform communication is abstracted to isolate system software and firmware from hardware-based platform dependencies. Instead of threaded drivers creating a persistent, dedicated link with resources, communication can be accomplished via a common, platform-independent message packet protocol. This patent is also a continuation of the ‘303 patent and was issued March 28, 2002. For a .pdf of this patent, click here.